The 337th Five Star Mixtape Is Brought to You By Daphne du Maurier

This week's Five Star Mixtape great blog roundup is brought to you by an advocate for the devil, transparency and hope to build a better a future, Ask Culture and Guess Culture, a realist's belief, racism running through everything, grief for a distant mother, rooting out imperialism, and Daphne du Maurier:

Daphne du Maurier
I suppose sooner or later in the life of everyone comes a moment of trial. We all of us have our particular devil who rides us and torments us, and we must give battle in the end.
— Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca

Happy reading!


"Permission To Play Devil’s Advocate Denied" by Mallory Ortberg at The Toast:

Our records indicate that you have requested to play devil’s advocate for either “just a second here” or “just a minute here” over fourteen times in the last financial quarter. While we appreciate your enthusiasm, priority must be given to those who have not yet played the position.

"Designing hope: Some ramblings and personal reflections on ICDE2015" by Paul Prinsloo at Open Distance Teaching and Learning:

We should critically look at the words we use in our strategies and planning documents and our obsession to measure, to be top, to be the best, to rise in the rankings.

Somehow we must discover the beauty and simplicity of hope, and designing hope. Hope that a better life of all may, may just be possible.

"Ask Culture and Guess Culture" by DevTesla at MetaFilter Guided Tours:

Another thread of discussion popped up around whether or not the woman asking for a place to stay was being rude. Some posters couldn’t understand how simply asking to stay in someone’s apartment was rude, while another went as far to say that putting someone in the position “having to be rude and say no” was rude in and of itself.

It is into this context that user tangerine contributes this answer…

"Coming Out Of The Closet On The Limits Of Faith" by Paul E. Martin at Paulosophia:

“Paul, you sound like an atheist.” I listened and said “thank you” and then escaped back to hopelessness and despair and this soothing force called reality.
I was once a preacher. With total certainty (as if I knew anything about loss), I preached dozens of sermons to that poor flock about the power of prayer. About the power of faith. About “moving mountains.”

"Why I’m Absolutely an Angry Black Woman" by Dominique Matti at Medium's Those People:

Because when I was five, my kindergarten classmate told me I couldn’t be the princess in the game we were playing because black girls couldn’t be princesses. Because I was in third grade the first time a teacher seemed shocked at how “well-spoken” I was. Because in fourth grade I was told my crush didn’t like black girls. Because in sixth grade a different crush told me I was pretty — for a black girl.

"Grief: It's What's For Dinner" by Marika Malaea at The Hamazon:

So I went to McDonald’s and ate nine million French fries, which is the equivalent of punching my kidneys in the face with brass knuckles. I shed angry tears in that McDonald’s booth, too, overwhelmed by my terrible choices in where to cry and what to eat. A couple of stoned homeless guys stopped by to see if I was okay — yes, two people on drugs without teeth or a place to shower were worried about me. Trust me when I say this wasn’t your classic lean in moment. Sheryl Sandberg never mentioned how to sit at a table that’s mostly on fire.

"The Faith that Does Not Know It is Faith: On Atheism, Imperialism and the Other" by Emily Pothast at Translinguistic Other:

Today’s New Atheists have correctly identified many of the problems inherent with the institutional history of Christianity, however they have all too often neglected to shed the other Eurocentric assumptions they have inherited from its colonialist, imperialist history, particularly its myth of self-superiority. By failing to see that monotheism is the tool of imperialism and not the other way around, they have cut the head of “god” off the deity only to replace it with the head of white male European Rationalism.

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