Elan Morgan is a writer and web designer who works from Elan.Works, a designer and editor at GenderAvenger, and a speaker who has spoken across North America. They believe in and work to grow both personal and professional quality, genuine community, and meaningful content online.

Five Star Mixtape 376: Seven Great Blog Posts and a Walter Mosley Quote

Five Star Mixtape 376: Seven Great Blog Posts and a Walter Mosley Quote

This week's Five Star Mixtape great blog roundup is brought to you by name-calling, stereotyping girls, connectedness, ownership and insiders, love, doing what you love, a world that flatters us, and Walter Mosley:

by David Shankbone [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

by David Shankbone [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

We live in capitalism, and capitalism is defined by the production line, and the production line is defined by specificity. If you see yourself as an artist, which I do, then you can't be limited by that. You can't let somebody tell you, 'Well, you can only draw this kind of picture or write that kind of book.'
— Walter Mosley —

Happy reading!


"Shoes, or What Not to Do When People Call You Names" by Nathan James at The Relative Cartographer:

…my partner asked if I’d heard what the guy said. I had. Despite the racket of the idling bus, I’d heard him clearly. He said, in an almost genial tone, “How’s it going, faggot?”

"Let’s Stop Saying It’s Jealousy" by Whitney Fleming at Playdates On Fridays:

When we tell our daughters consistently that girls are jealous of them, we are perpetuating a stereotype we’ve lived for too long.

"How to Caramelize Onions" by Rowan at CrossKnit:

Start by filling the house with people.

It’s not worth it to cook caramelized onions for fewer than ten people, so you’ll need to begin by making some friends. Encourage them to bring their friends. Start a craft night on Wednesdays. Leave the door unlocked…

"For Now, Our Own" by Kate Bowles at Music for Deckchairs:

It’s the global political scale of this homelessness, the mobility of whole populations for whom the modern projects of both nation and property have entirely fallen apart, that presses an anxiety of ownership on the rest of us. Having a home is more than a matter of shelter, it’s the presentation of a certain kind of survivorship, assessed in cultural competence, the assertion of literacy, the visible privilege of know-how. And like home ownership, domain ownership is the practice of insiders, survivors, using the skills and languages that flex their cultural power by asking to be taken entirely for granted, not just in terms of what appears on the screen but increasingly in terms of the coding that lies beneath it.

"Every Version of Love" by Laura Misztela at something(s)undone:

It’s a traffic accident. It’s a fire burning out an abandoned building, with no sirens wailing. It’s a decapitation and it’s a mosquito bite.

That perfect, big love is exquisitely terrible.

"Doing This" by Sarah Joy Shockey at Medium's ART + marketing:

I was in a comedy band for five years…

"The Consolations of a Technologically Re-enchanted World" by L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing:

Part of what makes the effort to understand technology so fascinating and challenging is that we are not, finally, trying to understand discreet artifacts or even expansive systems; what we are really trying to understand is the human condition, alternatively and sometimes simultaneously expressed, constituted, and frustrated by our use of all that we call technology.

Five Star Mixtape great blog roundup

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251/365: Feel Your Bones Let Go

251/365: Feel Your Bones Let Go

250/365: Lick the Whole Plate Clean

250/365: Lick the Whole Plate Clean