Five Star Blog Roundup 419: Three Great Posts and a Terry Griggs Quote

This week's Five Star Blog Roundup is brought to you by the reflexive and summary dismissal of women, the power of burlesque, a fictional history when things were better, and a quote by Terry Griggs:

Writing is difficult and exacting, but I would be lost without it.
— Terry Griggs —

Happy reading!

"On Minimization as a Patriarchal Reflex" by Matthew Remski at Matthew Remski:

My minimizing reflex is mobilized in an instant. The speed is a clue. My partner gives me feedback. Whatever the content is I instantly reframe it so I can feel like it’s either personal attack on me, or — and this is harder to see – as a problem that I am now responsible for, on behalf of someone who I instantly tell myself is overreacting. Both reframes are designed to render the incoming data dismissible. That data could be about real blindspots I have and real harm I’m causing, but I’m skilled at lumping it in with things I claim are insignificant, or flipping it into a character judgment on my partner. I’ve also done this with women I’m working with.

It all happens automatically.

"Why Nobody Likes to Come Alone" by Unknown at The Menagerie Burlesque Company:

When I draw my fingers over my collarbone, I want you to lean forward to watch their progression. More than that, I want your breath to catch when you feel their progression over your own collarbone. So while we could position our shows as entirely artistic, it would be dishonest. It would rob the performers of the positive power that we hold when we’re on stage eliciting a specific reaction from our audience, and it would be less truly artistic in the attempt to ease our audience’s unnecessary shame. We are voluntarily, happily, enthusiastically sharing this performance with you: there’s nothing illicit about it.

"Women Were Honored? Think Again John Kelly" by Marylou Driedger at What Next?:

“When I was growing up we honored women.” John Kelly, President Trump’s chief of staff made that comment at a recent press conference…
What’s remarkable about Kelly’s comment is he seems to think there was a time in history when women were more honored than they are now. And frankly that’s delusional. Kelly was born in 1950. If we look at how women were treated in the 50s and 60s when Kelly was ‘growing up’ it is abundantly clear they were not honored as Kelly suggests.

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I am publishing a post every day in November for NaBloPoMo (National Blog Posting Month).