Five Star Blog Roundup 415: Five Great Posts and a Colson Whitehead Quote

This week's Five Star Blog Roundup is brought to you by Hobby Lobby and cotton, growing pains, the power of data, sharing the water, Twitter bots, and a quote from Colson Whitehead:

by VCU Libraries [CC BY-NC 2.0], via Flickr

by VCU Libraries [CC BY-NC 2.0], via Flickr

What isn't said is as important as what is said.
— Colson Whitehead —

Happy reading!

"Cotton Is Not Inherently Racist" by Michael W. Twitty at Afroculinaria:

Systemic racism is a lot harder to deal with but symbolic racism feels good when we beat it back. But the heads grow back like a hydra. It’s useless. And some of it isn’t racism, just perception. 

Statues falling while systems remain is not enough.

"Walls" by Nathan James at Northwest Journals:

I shoved piles of papers, books, and pencils off my desk. I upturned dresser drawers full of clothes, cassette tapes, stuffed animals, Hotwheels track, and He-Men toys. As I self-plundered, my defiance turned to anger. I was so tired of this stuff, so sick of the kiddie toys and the sweater vests and the thick glasses. I wanted to be completely new, completely opposite.

"Haunted By Data" by Maciej Cegłowski at Idle Words:

In a world where everything is tracked and kept forever, like the world we're for some reason building, you become hostage to the worst thing you've ever done. 

Whoever controls that data has power over you, whether or not they exercise it. And yet we treat this data with the utmost carelessness, as if it held no power at all.

"The Grass Cannot Be Greener On the Side It Will Not Grow" by Rebecca Woolf at Girl's Gone Child:

I tell my children to prepare to be disliked for being themselves. For having ideas that are different. For having the willpower to speak their truths. To defend what is right. 

"Kindness only matters if you're brave enough to fight for it."

Protagonists exist in spite of antagonists, not because of them.

"The Botnet Cometh" by Kris Shaffer at Kris Shaffer:

…a couple weeks ago, the Digital Forensics Research Lab published a similar post(with a similar name), based on their own research. Their post awoke the attention of multiple, large networks of Twitter bots. These bots impersonated, defamed, and overwhelmed DFRLab's main Twitter account, as well as those of several of their reporters, similar to what happened to ProPublica last month.

This is starting to happen to me.


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