Five Star Friday's 236th Edition Is Brought to You By Daniel H. Pink

This week's Five Star Friday is brought to you by the importance of longer form writing online, a Boston Marathon spectator, a call for more mindful communication, the effects of culturally ingrained white social advantage, knowing when to walk away, the value of storytelling, dealing with the darker emotions that come with breast cancer, a struggle with self-image, and

Daniel H. Pink

:

Daniel_H_pink.jpg

photo credit:

CIPD

While complying can be an effective strategy for physical survival, it's a lousy one for personal fulfillment. Living a satisfying life requires more than simply meeting the demands of those in control.
     — Daniel H. Pink

Happy Friday!

"

We Used to Speak In Essays

" by

Sarah Dopp

at

Dopp Juice

:

Broadcasting distilled, emotional battle cries without background context to our entire Rolodexes is further polarizing us as a community. And aren't we polarized enough as it is?
I want us to speak in essays again, to connect compassionately over our differences, to listen, to be respectful, and to learn from each other. The fact that our audience has broadened to everyone we’ve ever met makes it that much more important to be real, human, and long-form about where we’re coming from and why we feel the way we do.

"

When Is It Time to Walk Away?

" by

Jen Hatmaker

at

JenHatmaker.com

:

There is a tipping point when the work becomes exhausting beyond measure, useless. You can't pour antidote into a vat of poison forever and expect it to transform into something safe, something healthy. In some cases, poison is poison, and the only sane answer is to move on.

"

Quaker Mode

" by

Mike Monteiro

(NSFW) at

The Pastry Box Project

:

As the world seems to be falling apart, and social media introduces a new level of cacophony of misinformation, speculation, and downright venomous bile — we should ask ourselves, is what I am about to say better than silence? Am I adding anything to what's already being said? And possibly most importantly, is my desire to say it keeping me from listening to what is already being said. Because waiting for your turn to talk is not the same as listening.
Have I actually improved the silence?

"

Why Do You Write?

" by

Vikki Reich

at

Lesbian Family

:

After the birth of my second child, I started blogging and, again, had no idea why I was putting words on a virtual page to be read by strangers (if at all) but I did it and I am still doing it seven years later.
But blogging changed me. It helped me realize that every piece of writing is a story unfolding, that my life is a story unfolding.

"

First Impressions

" by

Ashley Austrew

at

Zebra Garden

:

And then the tears are rolling down your cheeks, silent and warm, and you hate yourself for it. Your husband comes up to check on you, see how much longer you'll be, and you duck into the closet, pretend to be looking for something. You don’t want him to see because he wouldn't understand, he couldn't understand. How could he ever understand how something as simple as getting dressed can make a person cry?

"

Boston Marathon Snapshots Take On New Meaning

" by

Lauren Crabbe

at

Digital Photography Review: Connect

:

While it's not surprising that civilian photos are being used in an FBI investigation, the potential amount of raw footage under review may be unprecedented.

"

The Sound of Startled Agony

" by

Lisa Boncheck Adams

at

LisaBAdams.com

:

Perhaps I feel the written land of the upbeat is for others. My niche is here, in the agony of this disease. There is so much emphasis on "being positive" and all of that; I feel the compulsion to show the flip side, too.

"

I'm Not Your 'Black Friend'

" by

Crystal Sykes

at

The Bold Italic

:

The thing that is hardest to explain is that these jokes are coming from a position of privilege my white friends don't even realize they have. This social advantage is so ingrained in our culture that they aren't aware their comments are coming off the backs of centuries' worth of hardship and oppression. The tipping point for me was about two years ago, at a friend's house, when I was introduced as "The Black Friend." As my friend laughed off his statement, my heart dropped at this oversimplification of me as a person. I quickly realized that the joke was on me, and the punch line was my race.

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