Five Star Friday's 186th Edition Is Brought to You By Cicero

This week's Five Star Friday is brought to you by fried rice, being fourteen, fallibility, old grief, recreating femininity, politics and motherhood, the relief of a psychiatric diagnosis, what it takes to write, and Cicero:

Cicero.jpg
Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents and everyone is writing a book.
     — Cicero

I've changed the format here slightly. Back in the old days, I used to just have a list of links. Then, until last week, I gave every third piece a blockquote. This week,

everyone

gets a blockquote. It's anarchy!

Happy Friday!

"

The Fried Rice Manifesto

" from

The Busy Dad Blog

:

Harnessing the collective wisdom of my ancestors, I have drafted the first-ever manifesto on the science and art of the ubiquitous dish that no one seems to know how to make properly. Actually, it's just the wisdom of my dad, but he made the best fried rice that ever graced this earth. Maybe it's because it's one of only two things he knew how to make (the other was steamed buns, and sadly, I never learned the recipe). If the elders summon me to a death match because I taught the Gwai Lo our secrets, well, then you can call me Bruce Lee. Actually, you can call me that whenever. I dig it.

"

I Have to Believe

" from

Woulda Coulda Shoulda

:

I have to believe my fearless, mysterious changeling is still in there… maybe just waiting, for now. Resting. Nursing her wounds, perhaps, and working through some obstacles, sure. Gathering strength for the next chapter. Because I have to believe that you are still you, even though I can see that you don't.

"

How Failing At Marriage Made Me Happier

" from

In Pursuit of Happiness

:

I played an active role in trashing my relationship with Jared. I hurt him in a hundred ways, big and small. Never once could I claim to be the victim of a bad marriage.
The guilt and shame of my mistakes weighed me down for months.
When they finally lifted, I was left with a scar of compassion.

"

The Girl Next Door

" from

Alison Percival

:

It didn't take much detective work to find her but I was still surprised when the picture of her flashed up on my screen. It's taken at a private view and she's standing in front of one of her own paintings, hand wrapped round the stem of a wine glass. The same smile, the same eyes.

"

Ministrations

" from

Up Popped a Fox

:

For years, I shaved my legs because that’s what I was told to do. Then, I stopped shaving because I was told that I was conforming to traditional femininity though my hairy legs never did bring down the patriarchy.
Now, I shave because I want to, because the act of doing so connects me to my body and, when I finish, I run my hands over my legs simply because I enjoy the feel of my own skin.

"

A Few Thoughts On Hilary Rosen, Moms and Work

" by

Jill

at

Feministe

:

So this "motherhood is the most important job in the world" thing is an outlier. And it's a tool used to not give actual mothers their due. It romanticizes what motherhood actually looks like; since the job is So Important, it's positioned as something that women should be happy to sacrifice for. Of course motherhood should be tedious and financially stressful and uncompensated — your compensation is the smile on your child's face! And that's invaluable. If you think otherwise, you are probably some sort of witch.
None of which is to say that parenthood doesn't have incredible emotional benefits — the smile on your child's face is invaluable. But that smile doesn't mean that you should have to forgo healthcare or basic financial stability.

"

The Story of My Diagnosis

" from

A Day In Mollywood

:

I hung on and finally, in July, I woke up one morning and I noticed the sunshine. I walked outside and for the first time in a long time, I realized I was happy to be alive. For the first time in my life I realized that this was what happiness was supposed to feel like. I got control of my brain by taking medications that matched my diagnosis. I could finally live my life with confidence. I knew what it felt like and I would chase that feeling for as long as I was here on earth.

"

How to Write the Great American Novel

" by

Jim Behrle

at

The Awl

:

We need a novel from Kodiak Island, Alaska. And the streets of Topeka. We might never need another Brooklyn book ever. It's cheaper to move back home. And there's probably a better story about America there. You can't go home again, but go home.

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.

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Elan Morgan

Elan Morgan is a writer and web designer who blogs from elanmorgan.com and works from elan.works, spreads gratitude through the graceinsmallthings.com social network, and speaks all over. They have been seen in the Globe & Mail, Best Health and Woman's Day magazines, TEDxRegina, and on CBC News and Radio. They believe in and work to grow both personal and professional quality, genuine community, and meaningful content online.